Archive for February 26, 2008

The Usual Suspects.. of sorts…

Posted in Suspects on February 26, 2008 by gregsteible

First off i would like to say that i have no time to put a nice poem of my own on here sooo…  i will quote the one and only Cyndi Lauper:

if you’re lost you can look–and you will find me
time after time
if you fall I will catch you–I’ll be waiting
time after time

and now for the meat of the post:

Montague John Druitt

August 15, 1857- December 1, 1888

This doctor was accused mostly, it seems, because he dissapeared after the fifth murder and because he died shortly after apparently by suicide it is suspected with rocks in his pockets to drown himself in the river.

Joseph Barnett

1858-1926

This one time fisherman was the lover of Mary Kelley.  They apparently had an argument and he apparently tried to reconcile, but as is in many cases he was denied several times it appears.  He then, theoretically got upset and killed her and according to some 4 other prostitutes. Basically it is very likely that he killed her but none of the others.

James Maybrick

October 29, 1838- May 11, 1898

A cotton merchant from the best band of all time’s city (Liverpool), his diary was published in the 1990s that supposedly confesses to the five murders, but of course this was over 100 years after the murders occured.

Thomas Neill Cream

May 1850 – November 15, 1892

This man was a doctor who specialized in abortions, which would mean that he would have some dang sharp knives.  In 1881 in Chicago, he was apparently poisoning many of his patients, which is just not very nice.  He then was killed because of this in america in 1892.  He clearly was in jail during the murders, but supposedly his last words at least sounded like, “I am Jack….”

Michael Ostrog

1833-1904

This russian criminal often used disguises and aliases.  This is the only evidence for him to have been the murderer.  He even has a fairly good alibi, being jailed in France during the murders.

James Kenneth Stephen

February 25, 1859 – February 3, 1892

The reason James is even mentioned as a murder seems to be that he was the tutor of Prince Albert.  He also wrote a poem, because he was a poet (it seems deserving of a blog), that is very aggressive towards some woman.

Rosyln D’Onston Stephenson

April 20, 1841 – October 9, 1916

Robert was a reporter who arrived shortly before the first murder and left shortly after the fifth.  He apparently was interested in black magic.  He had an odd obsession with the murders as a reporter.  He seems to be the most intriguing that i have read at all about concerning these murders.

Prince Albert Victor 

January 6, 1864 – January 14, 1892

He allegedly was simply covering up a royal secret concerning sex, syphilis and perhaps illegitimate children.  It is possible that he had one of his high officials of some sort do the murdering for him.

Turns out i have a little time to share a few thoughts of random sorts.

The song Amie by Pure Prairie League is awesome.

Little Boxes by Pete Seeger is also awesome.

I enjoy Galaga over all other arcade games.

An ex-girlfriend of mine once put shaving cream on my car and THEN rapped it, “to protect it from the shaving cream.”

My car has been egged twice by two unknown people, had one tail light smashed in,  a rock thrown at it, and someone hit it in a parkinglot in highschool.  It also earned me the phone number of a girl that at the time was 21 and i was 16, which was a very weird evening.

Thats all ive got for now!

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Suspects…

Posted in Suspects with tags on February 26, 2008 by kimberjtrl

Montague John Druit

Druit was a successful sportsman and debater in school, and was a schoolmaster at Mr. Valentine’s School. He was later dismissed by Mr. Valentine after being ‘in serious trouble at the school’. He committed suicide sometime around the last of the Whitechapel murders, and was found on December 31st 1888. It is said that his body had been immersed for over a month. There were stones found in the pocket of his overcoat. On his body was found a letter to his brother, telling him why he must die, and a letter to Mr. Valentine. Druit came to notice in about 1959 when Daniel Farson discovered the Sir Melville Macnaghten’s memorandum, naming him as the probably ripper suspect. The memorandum described him as sexually insane, and that his own family thought he was the murderer. It also said that the body disappeared after the Miller’s Court murders, and is thought to be because  of the guilt (or possibly blackmailing that would prove he was the killer) that he committed suicide. Macnaghten’s documents are the only viable documents and writings are the only true evidence behind Druit being the killer.

Joseph Barnett

Barnett was born in London, but was of Irish decent. He was a labourer and market porter. He worked at a fish market. His nickname was “Danny”. He first met Mary Jane Kelly on Market Street, and soon became her lover, living with her at various addresses. In 1888 he lost his job shortly after a dispute with Kelly. He did not approve of her lifestyle as a prostitute, and it caused much animosity in their relationship. Soon they separated, and he visited Kelly daily and gave her money. It is suspected that he committed the murders to scare her off the streets because he wanted to support her. Whenever this failed, it is said that he killed her. Also there is speculation that he somehow obtained a key to her room.

James Maybrick

Maybrick was a cotton merchant, whose wife, Florence, was accused and found guilty of poisoning him with arsenic. A diary surfaced that is said to be his, and is his personal confession to the crimes committed by Jack the Ripper. This diary, however, has not been proven to be authentic. The diary details the 5 known murders committed by the Ripper, along with two others. Maybrick’s health began diminishing, which led to his death in 1889, from arsenic overdose. This would explain the sudden halt of the killings.

Thomas Neill Cream

Cream poisoned four prostitutes between 1891-1892. He was arrested and convicted of writing false incriminatory letters to the authorities with false names. He was a doctor, so he would obtained the anatomical knowledge thought to be possessed by Jack the Ripper. He was a serial killer, and poisoned his victims. He was hung in 1892 for the murder of Daniel Stott. It is said that his last words were “I am Jack…”, which is thought by many to be his confession to the Jack the Ripper murders. However, it is known that he was incarcerated during the time of the canonical murders.

Michael Ostrog

Ostrog is known as a professional con man whom committed many crimes, was a kleptomaniac, had around 20 aliases, and lied frequently about his profession and who he was. Many times, he persuaded himself to be a Russian Surgeon, and it is said that he always carried surgical knives and other instruments, and was habitually cruel to women. He spend most of his life evading the police and committing petty crimes. He is described as a homicidal maniac. I personally believe the man was absolutely insane. His whereabouts during the Whitechapel murders is still unknown, and many think that he went into hiding during the murders. He is described to have a mustache, be tall, and dark, and of Jewish or Russian decent. His entire life was crazy, and no one really knew who Michael Ostrog was. I personally believe him to be the most historically plausible suspect.

James Kenneth Stephen

Stephen was a tutor to Prince Albert Victor during his residency at Cambridge. He suffered a serious blow to the head in 1886 which led to brain damage, and ultimately death. He was a political speaker and president of the Cambridge Union. It is suggested that he and Albert Victor were secret homosexual lovers, and whenever the affair was broke off, Stephen cracked. He began killing prostitutes on dates that would have great meaning to Victor. It is said that the blow to head affected the region of his brain that was the primary cause of sexual murders.

Roslyn D’ Onston Stephenson

Stephen studied chemistry and medicine in his younger years, and worked as a freelance journalist. It is said that he was an excessive drinker whom always carried drugs on himself. He had an interest in black magic for some time. While hospitalized, a doctor noticed his excitement when discussing the Whitechapel murders, and he mimicked the murders. When hearing that the suspect sodomized his victims, he remembered Stephenson discussing this during the mime. Several blood encrusted ties were found in a box in his room at one point, and he claimed that The Ripper liked to conceal the organs he stole from his victims beneath his ties. Police state that he died in a New York hospital after confessing his guilt. It is said that the murders stopped because of a religious transformation he made.

Prince Albert Victor

Victor was grandson to Queen Victoria, and Duke of Clarence and Avondale, and husband to Queen Mary. It is surmised that the prince suffered from syphilis of the brain, which led to commit the murders, and that they were covered up by authorities and hidden from the public. It is also stated that he was a deer hunter and would possessed the anatomical knowledge to disembowel bodies. Support of the theory that he was Jack the Ripper had been deduced due to his alibi on nights of the murders. There is also a theory that Mary Jane Kelly blackmailed him because he secretly married Annie Elizabeth Crook, which persuaded the authorities to keep it under wraps and lock her up in an insane asylum. This supposedly led to Sir William Gull to use Freemasonic rituals to disembowel the blackmailers. He died in 1892 due to pneumonia, although there is a conspiracy that he secretly survived the illness.

Suspects

Posted in Suspects on February 26, 2008 by emilylsmith

Montague John Druitt

He was an educated man, a good speaker, and involved in Cricket Club. There was evidence that he was mentally unstable, and it appeared to be a family trait. It is believed that Druitt committed suicide by jumping into the Thames river. His body was found on 31 December, 1888. This early death could explain why the Ripper murders stopped.

Joseph Barnett

Joseph Barnett was the on-again-off-again lover of Mary Jane Kelly. He lived in the center of Whitechapel. On the last night of Mary Kelly’s life, she was seen arguing with him right outside of the room she was murdered in. It is believed that he resented Kelly’s life of prostitution and wanted her to stop. He wanted to support her, but was fired that July. The couple fought, and then she was murdered. His physical description is similar to descriptions of the Ripper, it is possible that he had a key to Kelly’s apartment, and it would explain why her murder was the last.

James Maybrick

He was a cotton merchant from Liverpool. The main reason he survives as a suspect is because of the “diary” supposedly written by him that “proves” whoever wrote it was the Ripper. He had malaria, and was prescribed arsenic for treatment, which is an addictive substance (when you take enough to not kill you). He became a violent hypochondriac. He died in May 1889, which would explain why the Ripper murders stopped.

Thomas Neill Cream

He was a Scottish doctor. He got a woman pregnant and aborted the baby, almost killing the woman. They married, and then he enrolled in another college. Cream took up a job of being an abortionist, and was almost caught when the body of a woman was found in his office. He began an affair with a patient (he had a tonic for epilepsy), and poisoned her husband when he became suspicious. Cream was imprisoned for this crime. Unfortunately, he was in prison until 1891, making the fact that he is a suspect a tad bit ridiculous. The only reason that he is on the list of suspects is because his final words as he was hung were “I am Jack…”. He couldn’t finish his sentence, obviously, because he died. So, we don’t really know if he meant to say that he was Jack the Ripper.

Michael Ostrog

Ostrog spent time in prison. He was in and out for a while, but was released in early 1888. He was committed to an asylum in 1891. He was Russian, and foreigners were the main suspects in the Ripper murders. He was also a doctor. He was a known homicidal maniac and known to hate women. One of the things against him being the Ripper is that he also committed small crimes, such as theft, and it is unlikely that a serial killer such as Jack would do such a thing.

James Kenneth Stephen

He was a writer and a history student. He played soccer and had a big, bulky frame. He started his own newspaper in early 1888, and was in poor health for awhile. He died in 1892. He is a suspect because he was a known woman-hater and for not being entirely stable in the mind. However, he never committed a crime (that we know of ) and he had no connections to Whitechapel.

Rosyln D’Onston Stephenson

He was personally interested in the murders and wrote letters and articles on the subject. This fits with the profile that serial killers often get involved in the investigation of their own case. He was a doctor, so he had anatomical knowledge. He wasn’t known to be violent toward women, however.

Prince Albert Victor

He was the prince, obviously. His case is the most interesting in the “victim” section, even if it is also the most ridiculous. He had contracted syphillis, which causes brain damage. He was losing his mind, and the theory is that he had a child with one of the prostitutes, or that he got his disease from one of them. This is why he killed only prostitues, and it is believed that people who worked for the royal family helped to cover up the Prince’s involvement in the Ripper murders.